Transect studies 2015

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Although I have many excursions and activities to report on (I have been quite negligent at blogging in favour of going out in the field and organizing photos lately), I will begin with the transect studies done by first year Marine Science students.

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On Friday 17 April, F block students travelled to Race Rocks at 7:30 AM to do their transect study.

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They got their noses right into the quadrats to identify and count organisms.

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Then they used water levels to move up in the intertidal zone, 50 cm at a time.

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They recorded all their data and will analyze it in an upcoming class.17155747946_273bd8385b_z

Weir’s Beach was the site of the other two transect studies for different reasons.  On Monday 20 April, we only had a 70 minute block for Marine Science due to the exciting announcement of the new president and head of Pearson College. It was a beautiful sunny day – perfect for a transect study!

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Although filling the water tubes was a little bit challenging (see above).17201316786_cdeaf040e5_z

Tuesday 21 April was a very windy day and we were unable to get to Race Rocks (out of Pedder Bay even!) so instead C block went to Weir’s Beach to collect their data too.

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Laying out the transect lines was a significant challenge.

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But the students persevered to collect data on the distribution of intertidal organisms.

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See Flickr album of Transect studies 2015 for more photos of the three transect studies and a post on the Race Rocks blog for more on the F block transect study.

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One Response to “Transect studies 2015”

  1. Eek, a sea mouse! | Pearson College Marine Science Says:

    […] this sea mouse / shaggy mouse nudibranch (Aeolidia papillosa) while recording data during the transect study at Weir’s Beach on 21 April 2015. One of the coolest things about this nudibranch species is […]

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